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Love makes you do the wacky

Discussion in 'Season 2' started by AnthonyCordova, May 19, 2017.

  1. AnthonyCordova

    AnthonyCordova Apocalypse Engine

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    Sineya
    I really appreciate how Season 2 offers a development of psychological observations on the topic of love: the idealization of the object of love, how such idealization distracts us from knowing the person the way they actually are instead, how our attraction to people leads us astray about both the people we desire as well as other people too (it puts us in a state of mind that makes it very difficult to see the desire of others for us), the whole gamut. Some Assembly Required was an entire episode devoted to such topics, but Season 2 in general kept coming back to this theme throughout the season (obviously). Do you feel like BtVS is trying to make meta commentary about such things? I don't necessarily mean consciously, but one does not have to be conscious or deliberate about projecting a world view or perspective in order for that perspective to be expressed anyway. These days, I look for the big-picture type ideas from things I read or watch. There is definitely meta-commentary going on in everything, Buffy included; whether it is intentional or not is less important to me than discussing what these "meta commentaries" might have to say about ourselves, the human condition, etc. So what do you think? Any thoughts or feelings about it?
     
  2. Ethan Reigns

    Ethan Reigns Scooby

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    Sineya
    I think it is quite possible to write a series displaying the human condition and specifically how someone can idealize someone they love without attempting to convert the reader over to any particular way of thinking. I don't see Joss saying that things happen a particular way because they always have to happen in the same particular way, such as you might see in religious novels or politicized stories like the works of Ayn Rand or the opposing Soviet novels. As for the perceptions people bring to their circumstances, if five people see a traffic accident you will get five (maybe six) different opinions of what happened, so eyewitness testimony is never as reliable as people might think. A writer always has a world-view and there is also the zeitgeist (spirit of the times) that is going to set the atmosphere in a story but it does not have to go beyond that.

    Since you specifically mention Season 2, I saw it as being about the dangers of wishful thinking and assuming everything will come out all right in the end. Joss (and Hollywood in general) has a liberal point of view but Buffy does not as we see in "I Only Have Eyes for You". Her sense of moral certainty and people being beyond redemption causes her to take the part of the murderer rather than the victim in this episode. Elsewhere we see innocent people paying a penalty for Buffy's inability to do her job, namely to stake Angelus for the benefit of everyone. In spite of the liberal attitude, having sex unleashes evil on the world and the first victim is the woman outside of Angel's apartment but it escalated to Willow's fish, Jenny's uncle Janos and the most devastating one is Jenny. This is where Buffy begins to see that there are consequences to what she does and some consequences are irreversible. Indeed, Joss has a puritanical attitude to sex that continues in "Where the Wild Things Are". Is this actually how he sees things or is it just an element of the story that makes things happen? We never know his attitude on this.

    I don't see "Some Assembly Required" as being about idealization - this was a ripoff of "Bride of Frankenstein" and the only item of world view was the obligation of the monster's brother to find or manufacture a mate for him. Why would he have that obligation? It is not necessarily part of every culture but it seems to be paramount in this particular family.
     
  3. Cordeliagirl

    Cordeliagirl Oh, Buffy, we're sisters! With different hair.

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    Sineya
    My favorite Romance from Buffy is Xander/Cordelia, but i was upset Williow cheating with Xander on Cordelia and Sad That Cordelia broke up with him and sad that the relationship ended short.