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Willow's Spell in Same Time, Same Place

Discussion in 'Season 7' started by Priceless, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. DeadlyDuo

    DeadlyDuo Scooby

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    I think what @TriBel means about "The Gaze" is that Willow feels worried about what Buffy and Xander's reactions are going to be upon see her again. She feels she's going to be judged negatively because of her actions and that their going to be angry/disappointed/upset with her. It scares her, hence the accidental spell. It's Willow projecting her insecurities onto her friends by assuming they're going to think the worst of her. She wants to see her friends but she's also scared of seeing them.
     
  2. TriBel

    TriBel Potential

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    Yup - that'll work for me! :) Ta!
     
  3. Priceless

    Priceless I am now

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    Willow apologises to Anya and takes responsibility for all the pain and destruction she caused (after all she did try to kill Anya), but that apology is suspect if Willow really doesn't care what Anya's opinion of her is. Does Willow only apologises because she needs to use Anya to do a spell? Or is that too harsh a reading of Willow?
     
  4. TriBel

    TriBel Potential

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    I haven't looked at Willow too closely but, from what I see she's much more flexible, more fluid than Buffy. I think this is illustrated by the fact that her character bridges magic and science/technology, two opposing forces. There's also her sexuality - in terms of what it represents, it questions the fundamental opposition of male/female. From this perspective, you'd expect her to be more accepting of demons - she represents a questioning of dichotomies. However, BtVS is making far more of the unreliability of speech acts. By this I mean, we say things and sometimes they're just form, designed to keep social structures in place and society running smoothly- we don't mean what we say or we say things we genuinely think we mean but unconsciously we don't.* "Sorry" seems to be an ideal example of this. So the answer to your question is maybe - but I don't think it's harsh. I think the text is designed to make you ask these questions.

    I thought I'd just done my usual digression when I waffled on about the photos but I think one of the points the episode was making was we're never really in the now. That what we say/do is influenced by, and always carries a trace of both past and the future - that, in effect, different times bleed into now. Dawn on the sofa seemed to allude to Joyce in The Body. Willow was wearing pinstripe trousers: Buffy wears them in Empty Places - because of the title of the two episodes you'd expect them to bleed into each other. All the uncertainties introduced here carry both forwards into episodes to come and backwards to question what we thought we knew of previous situations. We know that in a different time/place Willow would be with Xander so hidden or unconscious animosity towards Anya is to be expected.

    Also - to go back to whether Anya and Spike could see her because they were demons. I think that's a valid conclusion but for a different reason. The text (IMO) is moving towards addressing the limitations of sight in the sense that "to see" equates with "to know" - sight is the privileged sense in Western philosophy and thought. Demons have access to enhanced senses - Spike was useful because he uses his facility to smell - but Xander and Buffy just complain about the fact that he's smelly (so they see "smell" in a negative sense). The fact that Buffy and Willow connect by touching (Touched) is really significant.

    *One of the best examples is when Spike and Buffy come face to face on the landing. He says - basically - I'm okay - I've moved on "my eyes are clear" - which is complete and utter rubbish. She says "You don't have to..." but he cuts her off. I think her next word was "worry". It's followed by a series of jokes and pleasantries where neither of them is saying what they really feel (the directions in the shooting script back this up).

    I'm making most (not all) of this rubbish up - does any of it seem sensible? I do think there's far more emphasis on the unconscious in S6/7 than in any of the previous seasons. In this sense, I don't think I'm reading anything that isn't already there. However, taking the unconscious into consideration can lead to a radical over interpretation (and it won't be the first time that criticisms been aimed at me!).
     
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  5. Priceless

    Priceless I am now

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    It mostly seems sensible :) But even if it doesn't, don't stop posting, because I enjoy reading them too much.

    You are probably right that Willow apologises to Anya because she feels she has to. She says 'I'm sorry I hurt you . . . and everyone' as though her sorry isn't specific to Anya because that would somehow be too intimate and read as thought they were closer then they were. 'I'm sorry I hurt you' is much more personal and sincere and loving then adding 'and everyone'. Later Anya suggest they became close during the spell and for a second Willow appears to agree, then backs away from the idea, though I'm not sure if that's in shock or in horror.

    I thought Willow laying on the couch was reminiscent of Joyce, especially with Joyces photograph so near, encouraging us to link the two. The whole episode is very much about what we see, the meaning of 'seeing' and the truth of what is seen. Both hearing and smell are shown in the episode, but Buffy seems to think of them as secondary to the visual, although it's what's heard and smelled that reveal the truth, not what's seen.
     
  6. Athena

    Athena Belinda Staff Member

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    Black Thorn
    I always saw it that Willow cares what Buffy and Xander think of her, so that's why she's invisible to them, but she doesn't care what Anya and Spike think (they're not her friends, they're in the periphery of the group). It's not that she's being mean towards them, they're just not her best friends.