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Dry heat, Dry cold?

HoppyHippy

My arse is not pansy!
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
5,692
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Australia
Sineya
Whenever I say how high the temp is, people tend to throw the "yeah, but its a dry heat" in the ring. So I was wondering, if dry heat is so much easier to deal with than humidity, is dry cold colder than wet cold? The sky is brilliant clear blue when it tips below 0C. As it is now at 36C haha.
 

Puppet

You rocks think you're so smart.
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Black Thorn
Who says dry heat is better? I would move to Antarctica before I would live in a place with dry heat. :(
 

NileQT87

Billowy Coat, King of Pain
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
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31
Location
San Diego, CA, USA
Dry heat is another way of saying dry, chapped lips and flaky skin. We also have hard water, so my hair (which is already fine and thin) sucks.

These are my problems in San Diego.

However, if you've ever been to the American South or some other place where the humidity makes the actual temperature feel many, many degrees hotter, there are times where it feels you're stepping into a sauna and it will feel like sweat is running down your legs just taking a step outside the door (total shock from the ever-present air conditioning). That's how I felt in Memphis, TN in July (a city that has actually claimed the lives of Elvis fans during Elvis Week in August by giving them heat stroke). Even late at night while walking down Beale Street, it felt a solid 100 degrees with humidity.

My paternal grandparents were in a retirement home in Thomasville, GA and my dad and I would fly into Tallahassee, FL and drive up. The last time we made that drive, it was a summer thunderstorm with HOT rain (my Graceland trip was a side excursion after seeing my infamous grandmother on her deathbed). I had never before felt HOT rain. It was sauna temperature hot. Totally bizarre for a person from California.

By comparison, I felt right at home in Egypt in December with the dry, warm heat. Obviously, I didn't go when the Middle East scorches everyone with 120 degrees. December felt pretty close to the typical San Diego climate.

Rome and Pompeii and July were far more moist. I was running low on changes of fresh clothes by that part of my 12 countries in 31 days, so I just wore my bathing suit as a top with shorts when we went to Pompeii. I knew I was going to get drenched anyway and the chaperones were actually using umbrellas to shade us from the sun beating down. Southern Italy in July is definitely a humid heat. Everyone was a zombie during our Rome walking tour from the heat and exhaustion (this was after nearly a month of walking across huge cities--and my ankles had been swollen to the size of grapefruits since about London/Paris--and sporting some hideous Birkenstocks since Germany because I couldn't even wear normal sandals anymore--then I ended up with a cold in Greece to add to my troubles!). The weather up to and down from Neuschwanstein was insane (95 degrees on the way up and freezing, cold rain on the way down after the tour!--everyone got drenched in their summer clothes).

I did notice on that GA/TN trip that my perpetually chapped lips and dry skin were starting to heal, though. No amount of chapstick, lotion and Vaseline fixes that mess here.
 
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HowiMetdaSlayer

Occasionally, I am callous and strange 🐶
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Dec 10, 2015
Messages
3,224
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midwest
Here's a description according to this website I found...
While dry heat definitely feels hotter than dry cold, it doesn’t not feel nearly as hot as humid heat.
This is because the body can efficiently cool itself with sweat, which evaporates quickly off the skin into the air.
On the other hand, humidity makes the air feel significantly hotter. When the air is nearly saturated with moisture, sweat does not evaporate as quickly.
This evaporation is a major method by which the body cools itself; thus, high humidity levels hinder the body’s ability to cool off.
 

ILLYRIAN

Druish Pervonian Wizard
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Toodyay
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NileQT87,
you might like to know that hard water exists in most countries of the world as that is the term given to water that has been used in a nuclear reactor. So no you won't have washed your hair in it.

Careful what you are saying about the Middle East scorching at 120 F that is near Bethlehem Jerusalem etc: and any person who lives there would not have white skin, which means that Jesus was not a white person. Tell that to the KKK.

You should note that temperature records are only what the officials state, I have experienced temps of over 55C+ (when that bubble at the top of thermometers was full) 136.7F.

Here is proof this is a weird world, if you go to the top of Mt. Everest it's gonna be ruddy cold yet you are closer to the sun so you'd think it'd be damned hot.
 
NileQT87
NileQT87
I said I'm from San Diego, CA. Get a grip on telling people they're racist KKK for being comfy in a place that mirrors where they live in December. Shove it with your accusations for something utterly innocuous. I would hardly feel at home in 120F!

sk

The Overlooked One
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
3,021
Location
Sweden
Sineya
is dry cold colder than wet cold?
Dry cold is much easier to handle than humid cold.

I just spent the week in southern Sweden and even if it's still above zero it's so frickin' cold because of the high humidity.
-15 degrees celsius (or so) in northern Sweden, where it usually is a dry cold, is so much better.

/SK
 

NileQT87

Billowy Coat, King of Pain
Joined
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Messages
359
Age
31
Location
San Diego, CA, USA
Illyrian... Get off your high horse, because your definition of "hard water" is wrong and the rest of it is a bizarre, unhinged rant. Reported.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_water said:
Hard water is water that has high mineral content (in contrast with "soft water"). Hard water is formed when water percolates through deposits of limestone and chalk which are largely made up of calcium and magnesium carbonates.
 

AnthonyCordova

Snakehead Leviticus
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Feb 18, 2014
Messages
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Denver, Colorado
Sineya
Where I live, we are notorious for having dry heat and dry cold (Denver, Colorado). Having been to most other parts of the country, which are mostly humid, I think I agree that less humid is better. For me personally, it has less to do with the feeling of being hot and more to do with feeling dirty and sweaty in humid places when it is hot. In the Summer in Florida for example I always have the desire to take a shower to clean myself, but after taking a shower it takes all of 30 minutes outside before I start feeling sweaty and dirty all over again.
 

Spanky

Zexy Mercenary
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Aug 12, 2008
Messages
18,387
Black Thorn
Dry cold is certainly better. Actually colder dry cold feels better than warmer dry cold. If it's hovering around zero but a dry cold, that's my favorite kind of cold. Especially if no snow.
 

HoppyHippy

My arse is not pansy!
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
5,692
Location
Australia
Sineya
I agree humidty is sticky. Has anyone here been to QLD? I have no idea how people live like that haha. I am quite comfy working in dry heat up to about 36C. If it gets higher than that I gotta work inside or in the shade but wont pike out until its over 40C. When I go to QLD, I am in the pool or ocean by 36C.

I was wondering more about the "dry" cold, the clear and crisp. I struggled big time with the clear cold but only -2C frosts at most and wondered if clouds and snow make for a nice fluffy blanket of trapped warmy humid cold. Is it more biting ice cold in the clear?
 

HoppyHippy

My arse is not pansy!
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
5,692
Location
Australia
Sineya
I was posting from my phone before so now I have re-read some posts. I love to bushwalk in -2C but to sleep in that was hard, mind you I am still using the extra warm doona on summer nights so I think they lied about its warmth rating. I hope this year will be better now I am off the floor. But I am still scared I wont be strong enough in time to lug the firewood in. I should really not worry about that yet. It is still midsummer here. Cross that bridge when I get to it instead of fretting and wreaking my teeth lol.


Who says dry heat is better? I would move to Antarctica before I would live in a place with dry heat. :(
In comparison to humid heat, which I can understand, dry heat is much easier to work in. Does Antarctica have dry cold?

Heres a vid for dry heat reference haha. Pretty much everyone on the east coast says a 40C Perth summer isn't as bad as their 30C humidity. I wonder where the sunburn is worse.

I had never before felt HOT rain.
The poms constantly comment on that here. Also it doesn't sprinkle here, it pours. Which eventually makes you cold when you're drenched through. Good part is, the clouds rain themselves out and I have never seen 3 days+ of constant unrelenting rain in my life.

You should note that temperature records are only what the officials state, I have experienced temps of over 55C+ (when that bubble at the top of thermometers was full) 136.7F.
You are absolutely right. I had a thermometer that reached 52C last summer. And I have seen station recording of over 55C. One up north recorded 57C in the shade. But the official stations seem to be set in cooler areas. Ie Salmon Gums, the recording station is well out of town where it gets much colder than the actual town does. Deceptive buggers.
 
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