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Rate the Last Book You Read #2

Taake

Maybe it was taquitos. Maybe he lived for taquitos
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Black Thorn
#1
The other one was getting close to the posting limit, so here's a new one :)

I just breezed through book 1-4 of The Vampire Diaries by LJ Smith in like five days :D (The Awakening, The Struggle, The Fury and Dark Reunion), if you like 90's YA fiction then I'd definitely recommend these. They were a bit cheesy sometimes (like I could've done with out the very last chapter of the last book), but overlooking that they're great. LJ Smith isn't afraid to get bloody or kill some people off. She's also good with backstory and continuity.

After reading these it was easy to see where Joss found some inspiration for Buffy! All in all, great fun and easy reads, with a lot of cool characters (even if Elena the lead isn't necessarily one of them).
 

JCoatsworth

UP THE IRONS!
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#2
Haven't posted in the book thread in a while, so here it goes :)

Last book I read was: A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie
It was great and I had lots of fun with it. It takes place shortly after World War II and with all the new immigrants there's a theme of identity going on in the book; is everybody really who they say they are? It's lots of fun figuring everything out and, just when you think you've got who's done it, new facts come to light and you've got to start over with your theory.

Not as great as The Murder of Roger Ackroyd or And Then There Were None, but a solid 4/5
 

Bluebird

two by two, hands of blue
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#3
Last book I read was Sapiens. It's quite light for a science/history book but I got the audiobook version, which I think helped a lot in enjoying it more. I would have enjoyed it a bit more if it had went more in depth on the science side, whereas it's a lot more like basic philosophy or something. It needed a bit more focus. I think if I had a physical book to read it would have taken a lot longer to finish it.

I'm currently reading Dune for the first time. :)
 
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#4
Just finished two things. Ian McEwan's latest novel Nutshell (2016). Which was a change in direction for him, but the concept was different, and a nice twist on traditonal thrillers. The pacing was just about right too. Quite strange, but I enjoyed it.

Also, read a recent X-Files Origins comic (2017). This focuses on Murder and Scully's teenage years before they met for the X-Files. It follows two cases side by side and in the different locations. Some of the dialouge was a bit too on the nose, but the characters were likable, and as a teen verison of the X-Files with some nice backstory, it was engrossing, and a decent mystery. Think I would read more.

Am just starting on Stephen King's Carrie for the first time.
 

Taake

Maybe it was taquitos. Maybe he lived for taquitos
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#5
Last book I read was Sapiens. It's quite light for a science/history book but I got the audiobook version, which I think helped a lot in enjoying it more. I would have enjoyed it a bit more if it had went more in depth on the science side, whereas it's a lot more like basic philosophy or something. It needed a bit more focus. I think if I had a physical book to read it would have taken a lot longer to finish it.
I got the physical book and found it very shallow and disappointing and I couldn't even finish it. Maybe I should give the audiobook a try instead.


Just read what seemed like the perfect book for me - Scottish Highlands, check. 1800s, check. Murder, check. It ticked all the boxes and yet... "His Bloody Project" by Graeme Macrae Burnet was the biggest disappointment (book wise) this year. It was unforgivably boring, bleak for the sake of being bleak (or rather to excuse the killing of someone because they're a mean person), and you could feel how hard the author had tried to write it cleverly by agonising over every syllable. I would only recommend this book to people who like feeling bored and have a lot of time on their hands.
 

Athena

I'm not what you think I am
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#6
I just breezed through book 1-4 of The Vampire Diaries by LJ Smith in like five days :D
I thought you were waiting for me?! :p

Nahh, honestly, don't bother. I'm still midway through stupid bloody (I've forgotten her name!) - Delone? D-something? Can I just forget this and we can move on to something else?
 
Taake
Taake
Devnee and YES! Drop it like the hot potato it isn't! (it ends like the first one more or less)

Taake

Maybe it was taquitos. Maybe he lived for taquitos
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#7
I thought you were waiting for me?! :p

Nahh, honestly, don't bother. I'm still midway through stupid bloody (I've forgotten her name!) - Delone? D-something? Can I just forget this and we can move on to something else?
Also, I got obsessed. They were just so much fun to read and I actually had time to read... The Forbidden Game turned me into quite the LJ Smith fan!
 

Bluebird

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#8
I got the physical book and found it very shallow and disappointing and I couldn't even finish it. Maybe I should give the audiobook a try instead.
I'm so bad at finding threads again. :p I think I'd be the same as you with the book, as it seemed to meander a lot. I love reading non-fiction science or history books, but I couldn't really figure out what it was supposed to be. Audiobooks are, in rare occasions, the better option. :D Though I see the author has a follow up book, Sapiens wasn't enough for me to read the next one - as far as I know the topic is speculation on the future of the species. Aye I can speculate too, but I'm not writing a book about it. I'm not interested in an author's abstract ideas unless it's someone I really like.

And to stay on theme I'm listening to The Human Universe by Brian Cox. Unfortunately it doesn't have his lovely voice, but it's as enjoyable entertainment as his docs.

I do read books too, but usually I'll read one and listen to another until I finish them and then the cycle continues. I'm still slowly getting through Dune.
 
Athena
Athena
I love Prof Brian Cox. He makes science really easy to understand for idiots like me! Lol

Taake

Maybe it was taquitos. Maybe he lived for taquitos
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#9
Audiobooks are, in rare occasions, the better option. :D Though I see the author has a follow up book, Sapiens wasn't enough for me to read the next one - as far as I know the topic is speculation on the future of the species.
I went on a date with a guy who loved the first one, and was reading the second one, he said it was basically the same but it didn't bother him because he liked the first one so much.

I've read three great books in a row
An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge (technically a short story) - Ambrose Bierce, Eugene Onegin (narrative prose) - Alexander Pushkin, and Into the trees - Robert Williams. Beautiful writing, narratives that flow and grip you. Very different types of books, but all stunning. Loved them.

So of course I was headed for a bad one, such luck cannot continue. I decide to get the audiobook of the recent hit "Final Girls" because I heard so much about it and it's godawful. I literally want to finish off the lead character, she's the worst, and the writing is like creepypasta trying to be fancy. Thank you Audible for your return policy!
 
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Black Thorn
#10
A Game Of Thrones By: G.R.R. Martin. Loved it. I watch Game Of Thrones, and I'm reading the books. I really love book version of the characters, rather than the TV ones. My favorite being Sansa. It's good read. But I feel like a lot of people won't read it. Because of the show. But I'm doing both. I'm now on book 2: A Clash Of Kings. Which is good so far. I'm on chapter 1. Ayra. But I will say; the preface for a clash of kings was boring. :D
 
GraceK
GraceK
I read the first book. I won’t read the rest until GRRM actually releases the rest ;) I won’t have my heart broken waiting.
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#11
Carrie (1974) - Stephen King 7/10

A decent page turning. Quite different from the film. Find King's language a bit hit and miss. Solid characters, and at times gripping.
 

AnthonyCordova

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#12
I am close to finishing Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Knowledge. It's a dense read, real intellectual granola; I think I started and stopped 3-4 times the last few years before finally squaring aside time for finishing it. That being said, I really enjoyed it. It is probably the most focused and detailed book on the new historical method that Foucault ever wrote. In it he describes the shortcomings of older historical methods that aim at grand narratives and the illusion of consistent classically discursive historical practices, and offers in its place his method of archaeology/geneology which is derivitive (not in a bad way) of Nietzsche, Freud and other precursors.

Each page makes close to a hundred diverse and interesting points of various kinds, so a detailed explanation would require a lengthy essay at least to do it justice. If I had to list just a few of the many things the book taught me, I would mention how I was brought to be more mindful of meta-historicizing; for instance, how the subject is both part of inquiry yet also over-conditions it, and how the frameworking of an historical analysis serves in many hidden ways to retroactively reaffirm modern prejudices and values in an effort to secretly support our modern views of ourselves. I like Foucault's manner of engagement and style. It flows. Which is a good thing, because without his fluid style and espirit it would be an unreadable book.

It's a classic, and I enjoyed my time with it, so I give it a 10 philosophy stars out of 10.
 
Mr Trick
Mr Trick
Yeah did Foucault for film studies, he can be very challenging. Some of it I do think is just bad writing.
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#13
Haruki Murakami - Men Without Women (2014/2017) 7/10
Decent collection of short stories which got better as it went along IMO.

And on the comics front, Darth Vader: The Shu-Torun War by Gillen Larroca (2016) 8/10
I was really engrossed in some of the political subtext, and enjoyed how it blurred the lines with good and evil, and themes like morality. The design was eye catching, and cinematic too. Good character depth and a well crafted plot.
 
AnthonyCordova
AnthonyCordova
I'm a fan of Murakami's longer novels. Well, his early and middle period

nightshade

Plotting and planning
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#16
Major Pettigrew's Last Stand - Helen Simonson

I read it at work, was a easy read and one I could pick up and put down quickly when I needed to actually work!
 
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#17
The X-Files Revival Vol.1 by Joe Harris with art by Matthew Dow Smith and Andrew Currie (2016) 3/10
This is rubbish. The story didn't interest me, and worse of all the characters are just all wrong. If you lose the sense of who Mulder and Scully are then you lose about 90% of the appeal of the X-Files. The art is really bland too. Its a mess.
 

Taake

Maybe it was taquitos. Maybe he lived for taquitos
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#18
Dumplin' - Julie Murphy, a generous 1/10
What I wanted: a feel-good, light-hearted, body-positive YA novel about a self-proclaimed fat girl participating in her small Texan town's annual beauty pageant.
What I got: A hypocritical mess that's mostly about a love triangle and fails to show the body positivity it supposedly espouses, in fact the main character Willowdean is one of the most unsympathetically judgemental characters I've encountered. She gets a twinge of regret whenever she skinny shames someone, but she freely fat shames the uglier girls around her like it's no ones business. She's insecure and uses her insecurity to treat othe people horribly because only her feelings matter.

The worst part was that the message of fat girls deserve love and acceptance as much as anyone else (no arguments there) was rather diffused by Willowdean's treatment of a chunky guy. Basically, big girls deserve love and acceptance. Big guys, not so much.

I had more of a feel-good time reading Traité sur la tolérance à l'occasion de la mort de Jean Calas - Voltaire (lenghty titles like that prove why you need meddlesome publishers who understand the value of eye-grabbing pithy titles ;) ), which I read simultaneously. 7/10 for that one, because it's witty, easily-read and it's kind of funny reading an excoricating critique of religious fanaticism using the Bible (among other things) as proof of tolerance.
 
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#19
Dumplin' - Julie Murphy, a generous 1/10
What I wanted: a feel-good, light-hearted, body-positive YA novel about a self-proclaimed fat girl participating in her small Texan town's annual beauty pageant.
What I got: A hypocritical mess that's mostly about a love triangle and fails to show the body positivity it supposedly espouses, in fact the main character Willowdean is one of the most unsympathetically judgemental characters I've encountered. She gets a twinge of regret whenever she skinny shames someone, but she freely fat shames the uglier girls around her like it's no ones business. She's insecure and uses her insecurity to treat othe people horribly because only her feelings matter.

The worst part was that the message of fat girls deserve love and acceptance as much as anyone else (no arguments there) was rather diffused by Willowdean's treatment of a chunky guy. Basically, big girls deserve love and acceptance. Big guys, not so much.

I had more of a feel-good time reading Traité sur la tolérance à l'occasion de la mort de Jean Calas - Voltaire (lenghty titles like that prove why you need meddlesome publishers who understand the value of eye-grabbing pithy titles ;) ), which I read simultaneously. 7/10 for that one, because it's witty, easily-read and it's kind of funny reading an excoricating critique of religious fanaticism using the Bible (among other things) as proof of tolerance.
That's one of the worse character names I've ever heard too;)
 
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#20
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger (1951) 9/10
A slow burn. But once I got into it, it was a very sharp, witty, sad, and at times moving novel. I was convinced of the world and its characters and dialogue was thrilling.
 
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