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Rate The Last Book You Read #3

nightshade

Your grandfather is a cat
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The Secret Commonwealth - Philip Pullman

5/10

It was okay, but there was no real interesting plot, it dragged on and had too many subplots. Plus nothing really got resolved.
 
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Feb 23, 2019
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708
Black Thorn
Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
9/10

Joseph’s dialogue is the most difficult thing I’ve ever tried to read. Apart from that I loved it, I’ve heard people call this a romance but it isn’t, it’s a story of obsession, selfishness and revenge. It’s a shame this is Emily Brontë’s only novel (well, if Charlotte didn’t burn her second one) as I love her writing.
 

Taake

Prophet of the Lord
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Howard's End - EM Forester - 5/5!
I loved this, it felt very much of it's time and had me chuckling all the way through, along with moments of pained irritation and frustration. I don't have much patience for the Helen's of the world, I wanted to throttle her quite a lot, then again, I don't have much patience for the Henry's of the world either. Yet I found it oddly moving that
these two struck up a friendship by the end

Of course my favorite character didn't come to a particularly good end, they never seem to. What I liked most about this book was that, though in a way it is perfectly predictable, it was also perfectly unpredictable. I always felt as if the author was at a crossroads and could take the characters in either direction and I was never quite sure which direction he'd pick.

The Landlady - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - 5/5!
I imagine that it is because he was quite sickly himself that Dostoyevsky was so good at writing these feverish short stories that feel so real it gets surreal. Like a strange memory you can't quite recall but that's a burden on your soul. It's simple, a lot its left unexplained, and yet leaves you feeling emotionally haunted.
 
WillowFromBuffy
WillowFromBuffy
We feel bad for Buffy being stuck with Dawn, but Margaret has it worse :p

Spanky

Scooby
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Aug 12, 2008
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20,004
Black Thorn
The Eighth Tower
An interesting, if not ironically funny, quick read that is meant to be taken at face value.
 

WillowFromBuffy

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An interesting portrayal of the collapse of a culture as white Europeans slowly establish themselves as the dominant power. The story is very interesting, but just like other novels dealing with similar issues, it leaves me a little confused, because the Igbo culture doesn't seem all that great. Most of the book deals with the various problems of living in a patriarchal honour culture. There's polygamy and warfare and domestic abuse and crazy oracles who come into your home to abduct your children. By the time the Europeans show up to dominate and subjugate, you kinda feel change would be a good thing.
 

Taake

Prophet of the Lord
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An interesting portrayal of the collapse of a culture as white Europeans slowly establish themselves as the dominant power. The story is very interesting, but just like other novels dealing with similar issues, it leaves me a little confused, because the Igbo culture doesn't seem all that great. Most of the book deals with the various problems of living in a patriarchal honour culture. There's polygamy and warfare and domestic abuse and crazy oracles who come into your home to abduct your children. By the time the Europeans show up to dominate and subjugate, you kinda feel change would be a good thing.
I was also a bit conflicted at the end of this book, but I appreciate the insider perspective and the displays of the complexities of the Igbo culture. I have yet to finish this triology, but the last one - Arrow of God - is on my to-read list. Are you planning to read the other two? I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on "No longer at ease"
 

WillowFromBuffy

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I was also a bit conflicted at the end of this book, but I appreciate the insider perspective and the displays of the complexities of the Igbo culture. I have yet to finish this triology, but the last one - Arrow of God - is on my to-read list. Are you planning to read the other two? I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on "No longer at ease"
It wasn't aware it was a trilogy. I'll consider checking those out.

Have you read Oroonoko by Aphra Behn? Even if it is written by a white woman and is more romantic in style, it feels very similar to me.
 
Taake
Taake
I have not, might put it on my list though, I like a bit more romantic of a style

ItMustBeBunnies

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Sineya
The Institute by Stephen King - 8/10

I really enjoyed it. I think its one of the best books of his from the last few years.
 

nightshade

Your grandfather is a cat
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I knew this sounded familiar, I read it a few years ago as part of the book group I was in, but the cover was different. The ending seemed rushed to me, at least according to the review I did at the time.

I didn't realise there were more books as well.
 

WillowFromBuffy

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I knew this sounded familiar, I read it a few years ago as part of the book group I was in, but the cover was different. The ending seemed rushed to me, at least according to the review I did at the time.

I didn't realise there were more books as well.
It made sense to me that the ending was rushed. The novel is really more about the culture that fall, not the fall itself. Once the Europeans appear, it is like a spell is broken. The world is less interesting and magical. Okonkwo is no longer the man he was.
 

AnthonyCordova

Earth Invasion Taskforce Unlimited
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Sineya
Currently reading the Alexandria Quartet by Lawrence Durrell. I'm not finished with it but I couldn't contain my desire to mention and promote the book here. This book isn't only the best book of the second half of the 20th century I've read; it's already possibly one of my top 10 favorite books ever. It's sui generis. Nothing I've read is anything like it. The writing style is decadent and rich, every sentence worthy of being savored slowly for its elegance and craftsmanship. Most of all, I enjoy how thoughtful Durrell is. He has quite penetrating observations to share on a broad range of topics, from love and relationships to the nature of subjectivity and perspectivalism. One gathers the impression of real plenitude from his writing. Thoughtful people would really enjoy this book. It's actually 4 books that form a tetralogy, all contained in one volume. The organization is really clever: each book/part explores the same events from the perspectives of different characters, with the denoument coming in the final book/part. The plot often takes surprising but satisfying turns, and as the primary perspective changes new things are revealed that modify one's interpretation of the events while also adding additional shades and depth to each character. It's an astonishing, brilliant work that was the reason why Durrell reached the short list of Nobel prize candidates several times in the course of his life. I can't recommend this book enough. This is a ten out of ten book guys.
 
Last edited:
Taake
Taake
Wow, what a recommendation!

Taake

Prophet of the Lord
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"Where the world is quiet" - Henry Kuttner 3/5
A short trip, but what a trip. Either a great example of imagination... or drugs. It actually felt like a possible rejected plot from a late season Whedonverse show or Supernatural.

So, imagine you're a priest living in a small village surrounded by mountains. One day a mysterious fog covers the mountain and seven of the girls living in the village have gone into the fog never to return. The people of the village start thinking its old gods, taking the girls away for some kind of sacrifice. You want to check it out, you try, but you're semi-handicapped due to some bum legs and so, you tell a visiting anthropologist the story! He's young, cocky, and eager for adventure. So he takes off, and into the fog he goes.

And then shit gets weird. We're talking time rifts, alien species feeding on humans and taking on the form of the person they killed, and Lahar, an unforgettable (undeniably female) white, marble-esque, telephatic flower who drinks human blood and is kind of... sexy? There's certainly hints of that at least. Oh, and she has an intelligent robot as her personal servant.

The whole way through I just felt like, "what. is. happening? And when are we getting to the world without shrimp?" Lol. It's very short, you'll read it in an hour. It's nothing I'd really recommend, but if you have an hour to spare it's not a bad trip, just a weird one.
 

Kratos

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee 9/10
Enjoyable coming-of-age story. Hadn’t read the book since school. Way better than I remembered. The movie just sn’t the same, though Gregory Peck was brilliant as Atticus. Some of the best writing and characters.
 

RachM

I'm busy. I'm brooding.
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Australia
(Re-read) Flowers In The Attic - ?????/10

This book defies ratings. It is batshit insane and completely addictive. I could not even begin to explain how crazy and intense and weird and wrong and creepy and horrifying and compelling this book is, nor could I ever verbalize the range of emotions I experienced reading it. Jesus Christ.
 
thrasherpix
thrasherpix
Back when I was a kid some girls who mocked my love of scifi/fantasy openly read this. After reading that book out of curiosity (not addictive to me) I mocked right back, especially if they tried to act as the sexual morality police on others.
Taake
Taake
If you don't give it a rating I'm gonna lock you in the attic… don't worry though, here are some sugared donuts, they're delicious :P
Puppet
Puppet
I've wanted to read this for years!
ItMustBeBunnies
ItMustBeBunnies
You have just reminded me that I should get around to reading this :)

Taake

Prophet of the Lord
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Flowers in the Attic (4/5) and Petals on the Wind (??????/5)

(Re-read) Flowers In The Attic - ?????/10

This book defies ratings. It is batshit insane and completely addictive. I could not even begin to explain how crazy and intense and weird and wrong and creepy and horrifying and compelling this book is, nor could I ever verbalize the range of emotions I experienced reading it. Jesus Christ.
This^^

But I will shamelessly give Flowers in the Attic four stars for the sheer insanity of this ride! Proud member of the #wehatecorrine club :p
I'm more stumped by the sequel, like, I... I don't know what to do with all of this, I think my brain may have melted a little while reading it and possibly Andrews has ruined me for other books by shaping me with her twisted logic.
 

ItMustBeBunnies

Bugger off, you brolly!
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Sineya
The Rust Maidens by Gwendolyn Kiste 9/10

Very strange and atmospheric. It made me think a little bit of The Virgin Suicides. I finished it in two days because I just did not want to put it down. Although, its not a super long book anyway. Its Kiste's first novel (I think she won a Bram Stoker Award for it) and I will definitely be trying the next one she publishes.
 

Ethan Reigns

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Oct 14, 2012
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6,294
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Canada
Sineya
The Lost Years of Jesus - 7/10

Just finished "The Lost Years of Jesus", the story of his travels to India, Persia and the Buddhist monastery at Himis in Ladakh, just west of Tibet. The story chapters are from different authors, explorers, anthropologists and theologians and the writing style differs for each chapter but the message is the same - for the 17 lost years between age 12 and age 29, Jesus was known in the east as "Saint Issa" and this book throws a light on what he was doing and where he went.
 
Octavia
Octavia
Oooh sounds interesting!
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