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Sky Sports starts initiative against online abuse

Buffy Summers

Yataro
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I am behind on my one hour of Sky Sports News we get here a day, and I just saw the segment on this.


"It's not OK to say some of the things that people say on social media. It has to stop."

This is the message from Sky Sports presenters and reporters, who have united in supporting a new campaign aimed at raising awareness of online hate and abuse on social media.

Presenters from football, boxing, F1, basketball, Sky Sports News and horse racing are among those who are sharing their own experiences to highlight the extent of this abuse on digital and social sites and the damage it can cause.

In a video produced by Sky and published on the day Sky Sports announced a campaign against online hate, the presenters are united in saying 'enough is enough' and that it's time for the hate to stop and for everyone to be able to enjoy sport.



What do you think about it? Is it needed? Will it do any good?

I think it's a good thing, but it's not just celebrities that are getting abuse, which is kind of how they made it sound in what I saw. So it needs to include joe average poster as well as presenters and athletes. One of the presenters said these social media companies make enough money to have a department to be removing these comments, which I have been saying since YouTube was created lol
 

Priceless

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I don't understand what Sky are going to actually do. We can all say we don't like it and it should stop, but what practical actions are going to be taken?
 

Buffy Summers

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Well I only saw a blip on the news and that little article, but it seems like mainly they are going to delete abusive comments on all their platforms, report abusive comments to the social media company, and if appropriate report the posts to the authorities. I guess there is an email you can send the links of abusive posts to to be looked at.
 

Mr Trick

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Well something needs to be done. Online abuse is a big problem right now. I just worry this might be more a gesture on Sky's part than anything which is going to lead to tangible change. But I hope it can have a positive effect.
 

Spanky

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What do you think about it? Is it needed? Will it do any good?
I think it's a precursor and opens the door to the banning and removal of any opinions that are deemed "offensive" making it easier to remove opinions that differ from groupthink. The road to hell is paved with good intentions, and while the intentions of this are good, I can see down the road to where it can lead.
 

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I understand racial and sexual slurs are offensive and should be removed, but I think they should have to define what is considered 'abusive'. Social media is a cesspit of abuse, I'm not sure it can be policed to the extent Sky wishes it to be and one person's 'abusive' is another persons 'honesty'
 
TriBel
TriBel
I tried to like this twice but I can't.

Mr Trick

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I understand racial and sexual slurs are offensive and should be removed, but I think they should have to define what is considered 'abusive'. Social media is a cesspit of abuse, I'm not sure it can be policed to the extent Sky wishes it to be and one person's 'abusive' is another persons 'honesty'
This is where the government probably needs to take a bigger role. Then again if Sky are serious about this I'm sure they have the resources to crack down on it.
 

Priceless

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It's a tightrope walk. I think I err more on the side of free speech, though there is stuff that is so obviously abusive that I'd like to see removed. Social media tends to hypocrisy in these things, saying they will delete hate speech/death threats, but only deleting those death threats against certain people and not others. It's all more political than humane.
 

TriBel

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Argh...cue "Woke Sky" comments in the Daily Mail. I think the idea's good in theory...I don't know how it will work in practice.

 

Mr Trick

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also one person's 'they disagree with me and it hurts my feelings so it's wrong and they need to be silenced' I don't support this at all. It won't accomplish anything, and could very well have the opposite effect they were hoping to achieve.
No but if someone makes a racist remark or makes a sexist remark then those are pretty easy to spot and quite clear cut. Being online doesn't give people a excuse to act differently than they would in person. I know there are some grey area remarks, but as a general rule what you can and can't say is just common sense.
 

Spanky

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No but if someone makes a racist remark or makes a sexist remark then those are pretty easy to spot and quite clear cut.
No, it's not. Because everyone has different definitions of what "racist" or "sexist" means. Just because one moderator on social media thinks a comment is racist doesn't mean it is. Nor should it be removed for that reason.

Hell, on this very forum I had my account suspended three days for a racist comment that I made which was simply a misunderstanding of vernacular.
 

Mr Trick

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No, it's not. Because everyone has different definitions of what "racist" or "sexist" means. Just because one moderator on social media thinks a comment is racist doesn't mean it is. Nor should it be removed for that reason.

Hell, on this very forum I had my account suspended three days for a racist comment that I made which was simply a misunderstanding of vernacular.
Of course they do. But the problem is you can't really look back to the past. What's acceptable to say changes over time. Also as a moderator they have the right to take down any material they feel is offensive. My point is online behaviour needs to start reflecting offline behaviour more. That way you would have less of these misunderstandings. What you can and can't say needs to be applied to the culture we're living in.
 

Priceless

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No, it's not. Because everyone has different definitions of what "racist" or "sexist" means. Just because one moderator on social media thinks a comment is racist doesn't mean it is. Nor should it be removed for that reason.

Hell, on this very forum I had my account suspended three days for a racist comment that I made which was simply a misunderstanding of vernacular.
I think it's a very difficult for a native English speaker to use certain words and not know they could be construed as racist. At least in the UK. There are words that we simply do not use.

It's a lot harder to police sexism because so much sexism is simply acceptable to society and often people say things that may or may not be sexist, depending on pov. If a poster comments on a female footballer with 'she should be at home looking after her kids instead of on the pitch' sexist or not? If it is, is it bad enough to be removed? Does the person get a warning? Get a knock on the door by the police? Or does nothing happen at all? Absolute tightrope walk that will cause so many issues.
 

Mr Trick

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I think it's a very difficult for a native English speaker to use certain words and not know they could be construed as racist. At least in the UK. There are words that we simply do not use.

It's a lot harder to police sexism because so much sexism is simply acceptable to society and often people say things that may or may not be sexist, depending on pov. If a poster comments on a female footballer with 'she should be at home looking after her kids instead of on the pitch' sexist or not? If it is, is it bad enough to be removed? Does the person get a warning? Get a knock on the door by the police? Or does nothing happen at all? Absolute tightrope walk that will cause so many issues.
Well yeah its sexist because its a stereotype that a female's only role is in the home bringing up a family and should not take part in a typically male sport. I don't think they should be banged up for it. But I would take the remark down if it was me.
 

Spanky

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What you can and can't say needs to be applied to the culture we're living in.
And therein lies the problem and why I am against it. I don't want you telling me what I can and cannot say. I don't need some invisible police force hiding behind a screen censoring my words and looking for hidden meanings and taking offense at things said that meant no offense.

People are too sensitive and too easy to find wrongs and faults when there are none. Sure, stopping the blatant and very obvious infractions would be easy to do, and it is being done now, it's just when there is more nuance and understanding of another person's values and beliefs that the problems with censoring start to occur.

Remove the anonymity of social media before you remove one's right to voice their opinion.
 

Priceless

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Remove the anonymity of social media before you remove one's right to voice their opinion.
I think this is a pretty dangerous route to go. So many people simply cannot reveal their identities on social media for fear of losing jobs, opportunities, family members etc. Especially women.
 

Mr Trick

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And therein lies the problem and why I am against it. I don't want you telling me what I can and cannot say. I don't need some invisible police force hiding behind a screen censoring my words and looking for hidden meanings and taking offense at things said that meant no offense.

People are too sensitive and too easy to find wrongs and faults when there are none there. Sure, stopping the blatant and very obvious infractions would be easy to do, and it is being done now, it's just when there is more nuance and understanding of another person's values and beliefs that the problems with censoring start to occur.
But society has to have rules and things you can and can't do. I don't see why that should be any different online than off. If someone starts a forum there has to be guidelines. If something's more nuance then there's space to make your point clear.
 

Spanky

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I think this is a pretty dangerous route to go.
So is censoring. But I reckon if a real person's name was used there would be far, far less comments that people felt needed to be censored.

If something's more nuance then there's space to make your point clear.
But there's not. That's the point. Because that is not happening. They aren't asking you to clarify your point, or they aren't trying to see from another perspective. They remove the post, comment, etc. That is the problem. Their job is to remove comments they find offensive, not to examine their own thoughts and ideals to determine if the comment really is offensive. If they don't like the comment it can be removed. Period.

Again, I think this could start off with good intentions but I think it could easily escalate into removal of any point that stands in opposition to societal rules and things.
 
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