• Thank you for visiting Buffy-Boards. You obviously have exceptional taste. We just want you to know that:

    1. You really should register so you can chat with us!

    2. Fourteen thousand people can't be wrong.

    3. Buffy-Boards loves you.

    4. See 1 through 3.

    Come on, register already!

Swedish 101?

A

Allycat

Guest
Scandinavian languages always seem to sound so pretty.... just the word " Knäckebröd " alone... wow!

So, how about teaching us non-Swedish people some about your language?
 

Joamna

frak
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
2,335
Age
36
Location
Sweden
Yay, this seems fun. I live in a hall with a lot of exchange students that wants to learn swedish so I'm kinda used to the situation..

But what do you want to learn? Do you want to learn about the launguage or do you want to learn some words?
 
A

Allycat

Guest
Both... just some general grammar things... and words... oh I know.. I wanna know how to say I love you... and maybe how to ask a girl to ;) you know!
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
6,478
Age
34
Location
Stockholm, Sweden
Well I love you is Jag älskar dig, I'll leave the rest to Time Bomb or Ape ;)

Like what grammar things, hm..? I'd love to explain stuff just tell me what to explain =)
 
F
\/Fred\/
thanks for teaching me something! Jag Alskar dig

Joamna

frak
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
2,335
Age
36
Location
Sweden
Okey, grammar is just not my thing at all, I can speak the language all right but I don't know any of the grammar rules or anything.. heh.

But... "I love you" = "Jag älskar dig"
"Can I have some knäckebröd?" = "Kan jag få lite knäckebröd?"
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer is the best show ever" = "Buffy och vampyrerna är den bästa serien någonsin"
 
A

Allycat

Guest
Oh, that's a good idea... curse-words!!! :D

Though maybe personal pronouns and basic verb declension could prolly get us further.
 

Joamna

frak
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
2,335
Age
36
Location
Sweden
Okey.. here we go then.

"I" = "Jag"
"You" = "Du"
"He" = "Han"
"She" = "Hon"
"It" = "Den/Det"

"My name is ___" = "Jag heter ___"
 
A

Allycat

Guest
That's kinda like Dutch... the verd for my name is is "heet" as well :D
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
6,478
Age
34
Location
Stockholm, Sweden
Yeah I actually think Dutch and Swedish do have some things in common... I've had three teachers at my school who were originally from the Netherlands.. Plus faiths5x5 said she understood some Swedish stuff 'cause she speaks Dutch.

Thought I'd get into some grammar just 'cause it's fun, eh ;)
So, some regular verbs, here we go:

jump/s = hoppa
jumped = hoppade
have jumped = har hoppat

throw/s = kasta
threw = kastade
have thrown = har kastat

Okay, enough with the boring stuff, what other words do you guys wanna know..?

Okay maybe the basic introduction thingy, which is always sort of the first thing you learn.

Hi, my name is *eponinethen*. I am *19* years old and I live in *Umeå*.
=
Hej, jag heter *eponinethen*. Jag är *19* år gammal och bor i *Umeå*.

(Yeah yeah I'm lame..)
 

Warlock

Townie
Joined
Oct 16, 2004
Messages
92
Location
Stockholm
Swedish nouns are divided into declensions depending on their stem, how the plural is formed, and on their gender (which is either 'uter' or 'neuter'). Within these declensions, they are inflected according to:

Number: singular or plural.
Definiteness: definite or indefinite.
Case: nominative or genitive. (In Old Swedish, also accusative and dative, which has survived in a few standard phrases.)
Inflection by case is rather trivial: the genitive is the nominative with an "s" suffixed, if the word doesn't already end in an "s" sound, in which case nothing (or, optionally, an apostrope) is added. A few words and names borrowed from Latin have latin genitives, although it is possible to ignore this and treat them like other words.
There are essentially five declensions:

First declension, plural indefinite on -or.
There are two groups of words within this declension, those that have a singular indefinite suffix -a, and those that use the bare stem. The words with an -a suffix in the singular indefinite uses -an to make the singular definite. The other words use -en. All words in this declension are uter.

Second declension, plural indefinite on -ar.
Like the first declension, the second also has two primary groups of words; those that add -e in singular indefinite, and those which use the bare stem. The singular definite has an -en suffix. All words in this declension are uter.

Third declension, plural indefinite on -(e)r.
Words of this declension always use the bare stem for the singular indefinite, and add -(e)n or -(e)t in the singular definite. There are both neuter and uter words in this declension.

Fourth declension, plural indefinite on -(e)n.
Singular indefinite: bare stem. Singular definite: -(e)t. There are only neuter words in this declension.

Fifth declension. Plural indefinite: bare stem.
Singular indefinite: bare stem. Singular definite: -(e)t or -(e)n. There are both neuter and uter words in this declension.

All nouns, except neuters of the fifth declension and some irregular words, add -na to the indefinite plural to form the definite plural. But words with a plural already ending in "n" do not usually double this "n" except in special cases, most of which concern words that are irregular for other reasons, too.

Fifth-declension neuters have definite plurals on -en.

Inflection paradigm for the five declensions:

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
sg.indef. flaska buske minut vittne brev
sg.def. flaskan busken minuten vittnet brevet
pl.indef. flaskor buskar minuter vittnen brev
pl.def. flaskorna buskarna minuterna vittnena breven
English: bottle bush, shrub minute witness letter (`mail')


The gender can easily be determined by looking at the singular definite form of the word (which always end in either "n" or "t"); the words with a singular definite on "n" are uter, and others are neuter.

In the third and fourth declension, there are a number of words that end in -er and -el; these usually drop the `e' before the final consonant when an added inflection suffix begins with a vowel. E.g. en konstapel (3u, constable), pl. konstaplar, and ett papper (4n, paper), sg.def. pappret. However, in the sg.def. case in the third declension, the suffix is instead usually reduced from -en to -n, e.g. konstapeln. Forms such as konstaplen are possible, but often sound strange or archaic.

The third declension contains some neuter words, in which case the sg.def. form above ends in -et instead of -en. One example is parti, a word with several barely related meanings, inflected thus: parti, partiet, partier, partierna. (Two meanings of the word are (1) `party' in the sense of a grouping of people, such as a political party or a `side' in a legal dispute, and (2) a `game' in the sense of the occasion of playing it from start to finish, e.g. `ett parti schack' = a game of chess.)

Wan't that fun? Thanks to the Lysator project for the text.
 

Joamna

frak
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
2,335
Age
36
Location
Sweden
Oh my that's a lot of grammar.. even I learned stuff from that, heh.

Allycat: Yea pretty much, only it should be "Jag kastar flaskor"
I don't know if I'm correct with this explanation but I'll give it a try and you other swedes can correct me if I'm wrong: When it's something you are doing right now you put and "r" and the end of the verb, like this:

"To jump" = "Att hoppa"
"I am jumping" = "Jag hoppar"

It's probably a too short explanation that should contain exceptions and stuff.. but I tried anyway :)
 
A

Allycat

Guest
No, I get what you mean.. it's like the English continuous/progressive form (-ing form.) Only, I didn't use the progressive either; so, I'm probably still right :p Anyhow, thanks for teaching me that too.

Still, I wanna know how to say "I wanna make love to you." in Swedish.
 
A

Allycat

Guest
Which literally translates as I want love with you? How about an uncivilised way? Or are we supposed to be family friendly in languages that nobody can read too ?

Cursewords, can we do those?

Maybe some general normal words though?
 

Warlock

Townie
Joined
Oct 16, 2004
Messages
92
Location
Stockholm
Jag=I Vill=Want à„lska=(to) Love Med=With Dig=You

The less than savoury "jag vill knulla med dig" would translate as "I want to f**k with you" and can be made even cruder by changing it to "jag vill knulla dig" whic removes the 'with' modifier and objectifies the other person, literally "I want to f**k you."

Even in younger days, I wouldn't have used those words (unless in the throes of passion, with someone who enjoys dirty talk). Generally a "jag vill ha dig" "I want you" (infinitive) would be the one to use if no, shall we say, tender feelings are being expressed.

Cursewords are generally theological or scatological, sexual ones are rarely used except by immigrants, and generally not as a case of US English influence, but one of Latin American.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
6,478
Age
34
Location
Stockholm, Sweden
Not that I usually tell people that I want to do that kind of thing with them but I think that "sex" is the most used word in Swedish, if you're just talking about it that is, just like in English.

Well, the most used curseword would be "fan" (can also be spelled "faan"), not at all pronounced like the English fan though. Pretty much means satan, but there are so many words for that guy, and they're all cursewords in Swedish, heh..

Some general words... give me a list and I'll translate it, I just can't come up with words 'cause.. tired.. ;)
 

Joamna

frak
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
2,335
Age
36
Location
Sweden
Heh, another curse word could be: jävlar/djävlar. which means something like "devils". And I'm too tired to think of anything else to translate right now..
 
Top Bottom