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Willow's Day Off

ILLYRIAN

Druish Pervonian Wizard
Joined
Jul 5, 2007
Messages
7,593
Age
64
Location
Toodyay
Black Thorn
Willows Day Off

It was early on the fourteenth day that Miss Harkness started to become worried that they had been directing so much so much historical knowledge of the history of witchcraft, that Willow was becoming exhausted with all the information they had been filling her head with.

To ease Willow’s mind Miss Harkness decided to give Willow a day off from how the extremities of magic and how it could be self-aware of its relative behavior to itself. Miss Harkness was aware that Willow was finding it hard to relate to the knowledge that all magic was relatable to the rest of it. How a plant that was native to another part of the world would have to be left there even when good magic was used to move it. Willow could be seen to have great trouble understanding that evil magic could be safely used.

Willow had been taught how to combine good and evil magic to bring about a great strength to the power of magic. That only when a coven used a natural sex magic would true greatness be achieved, Willow had been distraught to know that she would never be invited to join a coven that practiced sex magic. It was explained to her that the coven’s of women who practiced the art of Sex Magic were all virgins; that only virgins could practice and perform true sex magic. Miss Harkness told Willow that she would lead her through the wilds of the country.

Leaving the open valley of Westbury Miss Harkness drove the van on the A38 to South Brent then onto a hardly used track to a copse, upon being told to watch the ground of the track Willow saw four wooden wheel ruts appear in the damp ground. Willow questioned Miss Harkness, and Willow was told that there was often a visitation of a phantom Coach at that point. Heading away from there Miss Harkness drove her van along the Buckfastleigh to Two Bridges road until a deep gully appeared beside the road.

Miss Harkness was almost pleased to announce that the gully was known as Hangman’s Pit as that is where the hangman was stated to dump the bodies of those he had hung among the realms of Dartmoor. Driving onto a different road Willow was taken to a tavern, Miss Harkness told Willow that one of the best Ploughman’s lunches was to be bought there. Willow was about to suggest they stop to eat there when she was told the Tavern is infamous for being the Devil’s local.

Taking the road to Widecombe they stopped to have a mid-morning snack and wander about the church and to read the message that was carved into a wall, about the devil’s visit to the village, taking the lane to Bovey Tracey was next. They stopped on the lane, Miss Harkness told Willow to stand outside the car and if a horse was heard to walk by them she was to offer a wave yet if two horses were heard she was to offer a flower to the sound even if nothing was seen.

The rider of the second horse is thought to be that of Kitty Jay, she sometimes follows her boyfriend who is often known as the Ghost Rider. Willow was driven onto the Hound Tor to Heatree Cross road. At a T junction where the cross-road section is into a farmers field is a grave for a young girl who committed suicide, she was deemed to be pregnant though her lover feigned he was innocent of being the baby’s father.

On quiet evening he is said to be present at her grave, after death had set him free from his father’s tyrannical rule. On her grave are often displayed the flowers left there by well wishers to her grave. Continuing along the road until they reached the crossroad of the B3212, a place made famous because of the stout tree that people were hung on. What made the tree famous was the man who would watch the relative of the deceased, then follow them and rob them.

When he was caught no one visited him in court or watched him being hung from the Watching Place, not until he was dead the ghosts of those before him were said to guide his ghost into hell. And even when his soul had left his body, still no one wanted to visit him. Passing along the B3212 once Willow laughed at the wild pigs in a field near the road, a laugh which quickly faded once Miss Harkness told Willow that those pigs were ghosts. As they passed the village the land of the hairy hands was entered.

Miss Harkness was glad they passed Post Bridge as the Hairy Hands had gathered many victims she turned onto the B3357 to Tavistock and abruptly stopped. Miss Harkness wanted Willow to see and hear the Devils hounds. To see the large dogs with red eyes like saucers that pulled a red glowing carriage into a non- existent lake, (non-existent to the non-believers and the living). Further on that road Willow was told to watch for the old man who guarded the sheep and further along was a wicked witch.

Once Tavistock was passed Miss Harkness took Willow into northern Cornwall to see the town of Tintagel where King Arthurs castle reigns supreme. Also near the boundary of Tintagel is the beauty spot known as St. Nectan’s Glen. Miss Harkness took Willow there in the daylight of the day as it could be a very scary place at night. During the reign of King Henry the 8th his cavaliers put some monks to death there. No one knows who does it but travelers are not welcome at night.

Going home to Westbury Willow said she had begun to see that the when combined with the good could become so much more powerful than any sole subscriber of good or evil.


Do you like a good ghost tale, then please have a look on the internet under the address of Kitty Jays Grave.
 

TriBel

Scooby
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
1,794
Location
Manchester
To ease Willow’s mind Miss Harkness decided to give Willow a day off from how the extremities of magic and how it could be self-aware of its relative behavior to itself. Miss Harkness was aware that Willow was finding it hard to relate to the knowledge that all magic was relatable to the rest of it. How a plant that was native to another part of the world would have to be left there even when good magic was used to move it. Willow could be seen to have great trouble understanding that evil magic could be safely used.
I enjoyed that - thanks. I think you have the makings of a longer fic here. I particularly liked the above (I'm presuming you're referring to Lessons and the Common Passionflower she brings through the earth? Some nice points made (the plant might not belong but it can survive in England - even in the north). Some questions (not criticisms): why Westbury? a) Lessons was filmed in Farmborough and b) if Westbury, why not show the White Horse? I like the use of local myth because we're effectively in the proximity of Hardy country - literary myth. Dartmoor tells a story of a different England (I often wonder what difference it would have made to Lessons if Giles had lived on Saddleworth/the Yorkshire Moors)...as does Cornwall. Now please take her back and let her make a different journey - through Glastonbury, Somerset and the Tor. Somerset means "the land of the Summer people". Here's a nice note. I've been told that in the original script for End of Days (?) the scythe functions as a kind of divining rod to lead Buffy to the Guardian. It's a weapon closely associated with Arthurian legend and I wondered whether it was hinting at ley lines of some description. As I said - nice story - thanks. :)
 

ILLYRIAN

Druish Pervonian Wizard
Joined
Jul 5, 2007
Messages
7,593
Age
64
Location
Toodyay
Black Thorn
@TriBel,
thanks for the comments a longer story could be made from that, to start with just by correcting all the errors ie: right at the start I said about it being on the 14th day but I didn't specify that it was the 14th day of what. Now, regardless of where it was actually filmed it was said to be filmed in Westbury and there was no reason to include the White Horse. Had I included about King Arthur then yes, as that is where he and the Knights of the round table lie in wait to protect England - as they did when the Spanish invaded in 1588.
I'm glad that Westbury was set in Cornwall or Dartmoor it was a lot more interesting than the Yorkshire Moors. Glastonbury deals more with the legends of King Arthur than anything else Somerset does but to a lesser extent what about the Tor which is used in Cornish or South Devon as a localised name for a hill. I never forged any links between the Scythe and the Arthurian legends, any of the legends and as for the Ley lines, as far as I'm concerned they are only of any use when writing a story and do not exist in fact.
One of the problems with making the story longer would be the need to include greater definitions, massive amounts of backstory would be needed to include examples of past events such as the hoofed biped that walked from Dawlish (South Devon) to a place that uses greater use of false tales to make a story). There are so many cases of spiritualistic events, the occult, paranormal and downright demonic happenings. Another point of anguish (to me) would be how long to make the longer story.

Thanks for your views.
 
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